Friday, 28 February 2014

Competition!

Remember this experimental abstract piece? I promised it as a competition prize, but sadly it was never claimed at the time... 



So I'm offering another simple and quick competition in order to find it it's rightful home!

The painting was created early last year using sprayed acrylic paint, textile stencilling, semi precious beads and embroidery yarns. It formed part of the early exploration of my Household theme of work. It's far too pretty to sit in the cupboard for reference purposes... 


'Untitled' mixed media painting, measuring 12 x 16", on a deep edged box frame canvas, with painting continuing onto all sides, ready to hang and complete with certificate of authenticity. The prize includes UK delivery. 


TO WIN...

All you need to do is pop over to my website www.nickimacrae.com and find a piece of work you like, then post a link to it on my Facebook page wall, or tag me on Twitter (@nicki_paints)  (you can have one entry for each if you do both) saying why you like it! Simple! 


The competition will run from today, until 10am on Monday morning, when I'll announce a winner! 

If you have security switched on for Facebook private messages or I might otherwise have problems getting in touch with you, keep your eyes peeled on this post, which I'll update on Monday! 

Feel free to pass on word about the competition! 


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Terms and Conditions 

Nicki MacRae Art (2 Springfield, Morangie Rd, Tain, Ross-shire, UK IV19 1HR, www.nickimacrae.com) is the Promotor of the competition.

The promoters decision will be final. No alternative prize is available, and there is no cash alternative

Competition entries close at 10:00hrs 04/03/14. 

No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost due to computer error in transit or other technical failure.

Entrant(s) must be aged 18 or over.

The winners name will be drawn at random by a third party mechanism to ensure fairness. 

Entries will be drawn from qualifying posts tagged @nicki_paints on Twitter, and qualifying posts on the wall of www.facebook.com/Nicki.MacRae.Art Facebook page. 

A qualifying post contains a link back to a piece of artwork on www.nickimacrae.com with a comment giving a reason why the entrant likes that artwork. 

Entrants may gain ONE entry for a qualifying post on Facebook, and ONE entry for a qualifying post on Twitter. 

Non-winning entries will not be acknowledged. 

Postage of the prize to any UK address is included in the prize - postage is available to non-UK addresses at cost price, by agreement between both parties, payable by the winner. 

The Promoter cannot be responsible for damage to or loss of your prize in the postal system. 

Reasonable efforts will be made to contact the winner(s). If the winner(s) cannot be contacted, or are unable to comply with these terms and conditions, the Promoter reserves the right to offer the prize to the next eligible entrant drawn at random.

Confirmation of the prize will be made in writing to the winner. Failure to respond and/or provide an address for delivery, or failure to meet the eligibility requirements may result in forfeiture of the prize. 

The winner agrees to the use of their name, and will co-operate with any other reasonable requests by Nicki MacRae Art relating to any post-winning publicity.



Wednesday, 12 February 2014

Cross Stitch Textiles Art Experiment

I'm sharing this textiles experiment that I've just completed. It's a direct progression from the work I've been doing exploring household materials and using them create abstract collages - old textiles, wallpaper, etc. 


I'm really interested in embroidery and how in the past it could be taken as a marker of accomplishment or value for women - and how in very recent times there's been a revival in traditional crafts such as embroidery, embracing it with new meaning for a new era. 

When travelling last year I spent some time with my children admiring the 16th to 19th cent embriodery samplers and lace collection in the Palazzo Davanzati in Florence, awed by the beauty, intricacy and hard work contained within each. 

I knew on returning I wanted to expand my practice towards the realm of textiles - though it has to be said I'm historically rather a disaster-area where textiles-based craft is concerned - from the wonky waistcoat I made when at primary school, to my recent fumbling attempts at spinning and knitting... 

Using cross stitch appealed to me as we have, I think, some fairly set (twee, traditional) ideas about what it is and should be (though there are a few folk working with it in unusual ways - like the subversive cross stitch samplers with witty messages, cross stitching on giant peg boards, and unusual subject matter, such a Mexican sugar skulls). You don't necessarily associate it with Textile Art in quite the same ways as other embroidery techniques... Also I'd had a little tinker with it years ago (taught to me by a kind soul during work experience in an art shop as a child), so I knew I could limit disaster. 

I also like the graphic nature of cross stitch, as you'll know from previous posts on making abstract work, I enjoy the challenge of working with limitations and restrictions when making work - and whilst there are a wide number of stitches you can make, there is a finite amount. The lines and grids suggest certain things, you have to make decisions wether to be driven by them or disregard them. 

I noticed with cross stitch people don't often tend to treat the aida fabric before working on it. There are of course commercially dyed variations on the usual white of cream that you can purchase, and I've seen blogs documenting how to custom colour or dye the fabric yourself... but it seems to generally be with a flat colour. With my mind working from a painting / paper-based art point of view, it seemed to be a missed opportunity - and something I could exploit to increase the amount of texture that I enjoy including in my work. 

I hate saying I've had an original thought on something, as there's just no such thing, you know the law of averages says someone else out there has come up with it too...

I took one of the techniques I use for my collages - spraying with acrylic paints through salvaged textiles - and applied it to the aida. I'm really pleased with how well it took, stiffening the fabric was a sideline benefit, as I was able to work easily without needing to use a embroidery hoop or frame (thought he side I've held more is considerably softer now that at the start). 


The colours for the piece were taken from a recent painting I had completed, as I'd enjoyed working with them...



Over that I worked with embroidery threads (without splitting them down - I felt the textured background required bolder stitches than, perhaps, if working on plain white). I used a variety of stitches, and worked as I would when making a collaged or painted abstract - placing and spacing, stepping back, considering balance of elements, balance of tones... 

The sprayed elements suggested much of the placement of colour and stitches - either to add self-coloured texture, or emphasise a sprayed element, or break up sprayed elements... 

I used the technique of taking a photo and turning it greyscale towards the end to check how it was doing tonally. 


I'm pleased with the contrast of rounded shapes and square and linear elements. I'm also pleased with the areas where the marks left by the spray template textiles are strong (a floral element, rounded 'doily' type elements).

Untitled textile experiment using embroidery silks and sprayed acrylic on 6 count cotton aida fabric, 12 x 18". 

Any comments very much welcomed! 

Wednesday, 5 February 2014

Tips for Visual Artists - Developing and Strengthening Your Practice

Now in posting this I'm not in any way saying 'hey, I know it all'. I'm not making some kind of declaration of my artistic super-abilities either - far from it, I recon we're all growing, learning and developing in whatever we do all the time... But it occurred to me recently that I'd been thinking a lot about my values as an artist, the way I've developed my practice and the way I work. 

Here are my thoughts on being and growing as an artist (whether you work commercially or not)...



Recognise your rules... 

Part of what makes you unique as an artist is having those rules and patterns that define what you do. The things that turn you on and off. The specific techniques you employ. The things that flowand work. When you know this and feel confident about this you can define your art practice, you have a solid base for all you do. 

Working out 'what you do' is as simple as being present in the moment and thinking consciously about how you work.


Now you know your rules, break them!

Try new things. Experiment. If you 'fail' you can always retreat to the restorative embrace of your 'rules' and your comfort zone - but in the process you will have undoubtedly learnt something that will enhance what you do. 

Experimentation doesn't have to be radical either - it might be as simple as working at a bigger or smaller size, or restricting your colour palette, or using only one lens on your camera for a few weeks. 


Don't define your practice too tightly 

Following on from the above, whilst it feels comfortable to tightly describe what you do - don't let it define you. And, if you work commercially, that applies to how you describe your business. 

Joe Smith Oil Painter might one day be Joe Smith Oil Painter who also does some photography and relief printing. Sarah Jones Pet Portrait Artist might one day start making ceramic sculptures of her pets, and expand into portraits of people too. Where is the line between seamstress / skilled embroiderer / textile artist / mixed media artist - very fine divisions. If you start off making cubist inspired abstracts it doesn't mean one day you won't find yourself painting pastoral landscapes. 

I think rarely do clients, art-lovers, galleries expect us to so tightly 'lock down' what we do (yes, present the separate areas of what we do in a logical manner) - and I think in defining so tightly we run the risk of constricting our inquisitive minds as artists. 

On a commercial level, registering JoeSmithOils.com or making your Facebook business page 'Sarah Jones Pet Portraits might be restrictive in years to come - make it easy for people you get a clear sense of what you're doing, but do proceed with some thought and caution... 


Try to work in Series, or at least sequentially 

Try to see some progressive pattern of how you are working, it helps you build strength in your work, draw conclusions from experiments, to compare work and learn interesting things about it. 


Use all of your senses

Paint with music playing. Sketch outside en plain air. Enjoy the sensory aspect of your sculpting.  Change occasionally the environment you work in. Visual art is visual, but employing as many senses as you can when working only enhances your work, sometimes in ways you can't define or don't consciously realise. 


Try not to get too involved with 'boxes'

This might be controversial, but I don't like to let division lines and titles and boxes effect what I do too much. 

So what if you usually work in an area that's traditionally termed 'fine art' - it doesn't matter if you stray into 'craft', 'illustration', 'surface design'... How do you know that a sharpie pen won't be the perfect thing to finish off your acrylic painted masterpiece? Why wouldn't you try manipulating images of your ceramics with Photoshop and making digital collages? If that sketch needs going over with sewing machine embroidery, then that's what it needs. 

As long as you have a clear reason for what you're doing, the back story makes sense and you know where you're headed, don't let get boxes cut off the supply of oxygen to the creative spark. 


Don't be put off by the jargon - and use it wisely.

Arty jargon can be helpful for describing what you and others do, for fleshing out the bones of some concepts that are otherwise hard to describe, or explaining ways of working when you need to in some precise detail - but it can also be a barrier to people (clients, art-lovers, yourself). 

As a non-graduate in the subject, when I got my teeth properly into making art I felt hugely excluded by the flowery language and terms I didn't really understand. Excluded though is the important word - and I think in these cases you exclude yourself through fear. 

One thing you can do to beat the fear is educate yourself - read more, visit more exhibitions, go to talks and lectures, go on courses, get familiar with Calls to Artists and documents from funding agencies (who can be the worst at over-engineered art-speak), research terms you're not familiar with, talk to other artists... 

But also know that some of it is just rubbish. Some art-speak is used to create 'clubs of knowledge'  (which end up excluding others) rather than used as helpful tools to describe and discuss

Use the language you feel comfortable with - use art-speak terms and phrases if they actively help get across what you couldn't have otherwise, but never use them to 'fit in' or bluff your way through things you're not confident about. 

Use art-speak responsibly people! 


Use sketchbooks - or your own system... 

Many artists swear by using sketchbooks to develop ideas, practice, make notes, record observations. I think sketchbooks are great and a really useful tool - BUT - if you don't work in that way, or don't work in that way all of the time then don't get hung up on it. It's about working consciously, and creating a visual trail you can trace back and use.

Personally, sketchbooks work for me for some projects or if I'm in the mood for them, at other times I like to work by making sketches on lots of pieces of paper, or arranging materials on a table, or pin-board, or digitally...

A related issue is sketch practice, and like eating veg we all know we should be doing that regularly - however we choose to do it.


Art is just a language

It's just a way of communicating. Communicating what you want to say. If you keep that pure ideal at heart of what you do then in breaks down so many barriers (barriers you place for yourself, how you think people see you, how you encourage and inspire others).


Be Authentic. 

Challenge yourself. Test your limits. Experiment. But don't ever stop being YOU.

Whether for commercial reasons, educational reasons, to fit in with an artistic community, or in seeking to feel more confident in our work, we all can be tempted to shape who we are, what we do, how we do it to fit the moulds we or others feel we should.

The most important thing you can do as an artist is work out what your authentic voice is, and know yourself well enough to know when you're using it (or not).

When we use our authentic voice then we're drawing on myriad experiences, huge vats of knowledge drawn from all areas of our lives - not just those directly relating to art. The work flows and forms with relative ease. We can see the next step, and understand the last. People sense this richness and trust us, and are enthused and excited by what we do.

BE YOU!



I'm sure that's not a complete list - and it would be great if others posted a comment with any thoughts they have?



Tuesday, 31 December 2013

Household Objects - the Magical and Mundane

Vintage linens at Aldearn Antiques.
Those who take an interest in my work will notice the recurring theme of ~~ household objects ~~.

I wanted to spend a little time unravelling the threads of why I am so interested in the items that we find lying around us, and exploring what I'm actually referring to when I use the term 'household'...

For something to carve so deep a furrow through my creative processes there must obviously be an inherent interest. I think being a visual person I'm drawn to interesting or pretty things - through household objects I can feed my obsessions with texture and colour, I can admire pattern, turn practical to decorative... Why have a utilitarian set of plastic salad servers when you can have some that are smoothly carved from mottled olive wood, or embellished with canary-yellow ornate ceramic handles? 

What's interesting too is how we all define ourselves by the things we surround ourselves with.

Holiday house on the Isle of Mull. 
I became acutely aware of this for the first time was a few years ago when we went to stay in a rented holiday house on the Isle of Mull. The cottage was obviously a very much loved second home for the family that owned it (and let out to others when not needed). I guess for the first time in my life I had an experience of staying somewhere filled, curated and arranged by someone else for their life, someone who was neither there (narrating the space), nor related or connected to me in any way.

Once I had got over a funny sense of being a voyeur, I found great excitement and enjoyment in their little displays of treasures - feathers and pebbles, found objects, ceramics, children's creations, drawings and paintings, a much used hand-build toy fort, holiday souvenirs... 

But of course the things that surround us aren't always chosen in such a careful and considered way - we inherit things, we find things, things are bought in a hurry or without much consideration, things that are needed might only be available in one shape, size or variety, we might live in a rented space that restricts our creative expression, our surroundings might be the outcome of the combining of households or largely dictated by the clutter of kids, we might not take a concious interest in things, or actively consider things as unimportant or even 'bad'. 

Photographs from the Ness of Brodgar archaeological excavations, Orkney, from my time there in 2012.
'Beaker Abstract II' mixed media on smoked paper, 2011.
Taking an interest in archaeology and watching archaeologists at work brings another strand into play... Watching work on a dig, or seeing items on display in museums, you can make direct links to peoples of the past. The things that our prehistoric ancestors surrounded themselves - the tools, buildings, decorative objects (or at least the surviving ones) make up almost the sum total of what we know about them.        

Also when looking at objects you can go past imagining and actually begin to walk a little in the shoes of the original owner or maker... Having been shown how to spin fibre into yarn with a drop spindle means I can now never pass a museum display of spindle whorls now without feeling a sense of direct connection. Thumb marks left in pottery (either in manufacture or decoration) always leave me with the same feeling.  


My own poor attempts at spinning, and Clay Spindle Whorls from the 5th or 6th cent BC, my favourite museum finds from my travels this summer - image courtesy of the Acropolis Museum, Athens. 
Old suitcases at Aldearn Antiques. 
And even objects of more modern province can transport us to somewhere or sometime we have no personal direct experience of... 

When researching and preparing for the 'Ruin' exhibition with my good friend, photographer Gavin Hookway, one of my most outstanding memories was Gavin telling the story of a photo shoot at an abandoned and ramshkle old cottage he knew of... 

He thought the site might throw up some possible shots for the exhibition. As he was happily lost in detail playing with compositions, he noticed that behind the grimy, cobweb-laced windows, almost as if on display, were a pair of small ladies slippers. That discovery changed the whole mood of the shoot - and indeed the feel of the day - for him, because what started as an exercise in the study of decay and architecture became a window into someones life story... 

Everyday objects have power and presence that far outreaches their mundane purposes. 

On the point of mundane, another thing I enjoy about daily objects are the way something can be elevated in beauty or importance, how practical purposes can be changed...

A few years back I took this junk shop-bought table and used it as a canvas - quite literally. I had no intention of doing something decorative, I painted exactly as I would when creating an abstract painting on a more traditional surface  - therefore the table became a painting, or was the painting decorating the table, I'm still not sure. 

Detail from 'Soft and Hard', Nicki MacRae, 2011. 
Going back to the salad servers - perhaps part of the fascination is seeing if we can find the hidden joy in a pair of cheap, basic, factory produced plastic spoons? What *would* transform them from bland to grand? (in my own experience, spray paint and lace works) 

Household things can also be the 'transformers' too - I always delight in 'printing' with bubble wrap to create texture in paintings, cling film and plastic packaging can be incredibly exciting tools for the application of paint, and my use of old net curtains and sprayed paint is pretty much of a trade mark of my work these days...

Knitting with picture hanging cord. 
I've also had a play the last few weeks with knitting with unusual household materials - string, wire, plastic bags... I like this sense the of turning somethings purpose and also it's physical properties (simple to complex, long to square). 

This also leads me onto the related subject of handicrafts and feminism and the more political aspect of 'household'...

Whilst I consider my profession as 'artist' I'm also a mum of three young kids, and I work from home. Inescapably a lot of what I do in the average day centres around the household. I wash, I cook, I clean, I ferry kids around... I spend a lot of time in my home, and that also escalates the importance of that environment by sheer power of the hours I spend in it. All of this informs my art, intentionally or otherwise. 

Also as a modern woman I find myself feeling confused about who I am and where I fit in. Do I mesh with the idea of a 'homemaker'? Am I 'allowed' to desire an orderly, 'designed' home filled with pretty things - or does this inevitably lead me down a dark path to either 1950's values or giddy materialistic excess? And what of the fashion for the revival in handicrafts - do we embrace it as an accessible creative outlet for all, roll out the yarn, dust everything with icing sugar and embrace our inner Kirstie? Or do we see it as disloyal to our sisters in times past who ruined their knees grinding flour to bake their 'rustic loaves', or who were measured for worth by the quality of their embroidery stitches? As an artist shouldn't I be making bold statements about our society, or studying anatomy and classical figurative beauty, or making huge paintings or grand sculpture - not tinkering with buttons and lace on the scale of the domestic?

And so I suppose thats where the 'household' paintings come into the story... I describe them usually as exploring the abstract possibilities of household objects, but as you'll have seen by all the above they are informed by so many more things... 

'Household' paintings, 2012-13, Nicki MacRae.
And the final thread in the weaving of what I'm doing I guess is still life - the traditional celebration and exploration of things around us, and something I'm newly feeling excitement for...

Untitled still life, mixed media, 2013.
Untitled still life, mixed media, 2013.

Thursday, 19 December 2013

Christmas Competitions: Comp' Number Four

Again, if you've just joined the fun and are wondering what's going on, you can find out more here...

Today's prize is another small collage piece, measuring 12 x 12cm in mixed media - fabric, plastic watercolour and gouache paints, and crayon. It will be sent with certificate of authenticity. 

The prize includes postage to any UK address. 

You can find all the T's and C's for the comp at the very bottom of the page...




It's super-simple to have a go at winning this original piece of artwork...

It's a digital treasure hunt! 

All you need to do is mosey over to my website - www.nickimacrae.com - and search for this image somewhere (and pretty big and obvious) on the website. 


Copy and paste the direct link URL to the correct page to either Facebook, Twitter (tag @nicki_paints) or in the comments here  - the first person to do so on any platform (according to Blogger / Facebook / Twitter time stamps) wins the collage! 



Good luck! 

**** The winner of the competition was Carol, posting in the comments below... Well Done Carol!! ****
the image was hidden here - http://www.nickimacrae.com/photo_9858250.html


Terms and Conditions - Competition One

Nicki MacRae Art (2 Springfield, Morangie Rd, Tain, Ross-shire, UK IV19 1HR, www.nickimacrae.com) is the Promotor of the competition.

The promoters decision will be final. No alternative prize is available, and there is no cash alternative

No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost due to computer error in transit or other technical failure.

Entrant(s) must be aged 18 or over.

The winner will be the first person to EITHER 
a) post a comment to the Nicki MacRae Art Facebook page, 
b) tag a post on Twitter with @nicki_paints, or 
c) post a comment to this blog post 
containing the correct URL from www.nickimacrae.com. 

There will be only ONE winner across all platforms (Blogger / Twitter / Facebook). 

The winning URL to be posted will be the URL of the page on www.nickimacrae.com containing the collage and logo image, as below: 








The time a comment is posted will be determined by Twitter's / Facebook's / Bloggers time stamp on the post. 

You may enter as many competitions on this blog as you wish, but only one entry per competition will be valid. 

Non-winning entries will not be acknowledged. 

Postage of the prize to any UK address is included in the prize - postage is available to non-UK addresses at cost price, by agreement between both parties, payable by the winner. 

The Promoter cannot be responsible for damage to or loss of your prize in the postal system. 

Reasonable efforts will be made to contact the winner(s). If the winner(s) cannot be contacted, or are unable to comply with these terms and conditions, the Promoter reserves the right to offer the prize to the next eligible entrant drawn at random.

Confirmation of the prize will be made in writing to the winner. Failure to respond and/or provide an address for delivery, or failure to meet the eligibility requirements may result in forfeiture of the prize. 

The winner agrees to the use of their name, and will co-operate with any other reasonable requests by Nicki MacRae Art relating to any post-winning publicity.


Wednesday, 18 December 2013

Christmas Competitions: Comp' Number Three

For those just catching up with happenings, all is explained here... 

Today's competition is a very easy one to enter - just leave a comment here on this blog post before 7pm tomorrow and I'll use a random number generator to pick one at random, and announce here and on Twitter an Facebook between 7 - 8pm tomorrow night. Simples!

You'll have to help me out here, it can sometimes be hard to track people down by comments on the blog - so make sure you give me a further clue to who you are, or keep a keen eye for the announcement and email me if you see your name...

Todays prize is a tiny original mixed media collage from 2011. It measures a dinky 12 x 12 cm - but some of the best things come in small packages (so I like to tell myself)! It was created using water soluble crayons, acrylic, acetate, feather, sandpaper and oil pastels, and comes with certificate of authenticity.

And as always, please share with as many people as possible so everyone gets a chance to join the fun!


There is also still time to enter the draw for Competition One by signing up to my mailing list, or grab yourself the prize for Competition Two by getting yourself along to Inchmore Gallery near Inverness - scroll back through the last few blog posts for full details!


**** And the winner, drawn at random by a number generator, is Joanne Kirton. Well Done Joanne! ****


Terms and Conditions - Competition Three

Nicki MacRae Art (2 Springfield, Morangie Rd, Tain, Ross-shire, UK IV19 1HR, www.nickimacrae.com) is the Promotor of the competition.

The promoters decision will be final. No alternative prize is available, and there is no cash alternative

No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost due to computer error in transit or other technical failure.

Entrant(s) must be aged 18 or over.

The winners name will be drawn at random by a third party mechanism to ensure fairness. 

Entries will be drawn from comments left on this blog post before 19:00 on 19/12/13. 

You may enter as many competitions on this blog as you wish, but only one entry per competition will be valid. 

Non-winning entries will not be acknowledged. 

Postage of the prize to any UK address is included in the prize - postage is available to non-UK addresses at cost price, by agreement between both parties, payable by the winner. 

The Promoter cannot be responsible for damage to or loss of your prize in the postal system. 

Reasonable efforts will be made to contact the winner(s). If the winner(s) cannot be contacted, or are unable to comply with these terms and conditions, the Promoter reserves the right to offer the prize to the next eligible entrant drawn at random.

Confirmation of the prize will be made in writing to the winner. Failure to respond and/or provide an address for delivery, or failure to meet the eligibility requirements may result in forfeiture of the prize. 

The winner agrees to the use of their name, and will co-operate with any other reasonable requests by Nicki MacRae Art relating to any post-winning publicity.

Tuesday, 17 December 2013

Christmas Competitions: Comp' Number Two


If you've missed the all the hoo-haa and fanfares, I'm running Festive Fun competitions all this week  and giving five lucky folk a chance to get a little extra treat this Christmas. It's my way of saying thanks for the support and custom throughout 2013!
For all the background, click here...

There's also still time to enter Competition One from yesterday, just follow the link. Entries close on Sunday. 

Today's competition prize is this original mixed media painting, measuring 12 x 16", on a box frame canvas with painting continuing onto all sides, ready to hang and complete with certificate of authenticity. The prize includes UK delivery. 

The painting was an experimental abstract piece created earlier this year using sprayed acrylic paint, textile stencilling, semi precious beads and embroidery yarns, and is far too pretty to sit in the cupboard for reference purposes...




To win I wanted to challenge you to do something fun and interactive... 

I regularly exhibit with the wonderful Inchmore Gallery. This beautiful converted kirk, located just a few miles from Inverness in the Highlands of Scotland, shows work across diverse media - painting, ceramics, glass-art, photography, textiles, sculpture and ceramics - from a stable of local, nationally recognised and emerging artists. As well as being being a beautiful gallery that I'm delighted to show with, it's somewhere where I choose to shop myself too. As you can tell, I am a huge fan! 

Images copyright Inchmore Gallery 2013.

I currently have several pieces in the Inchmore Gallery Winter Exhibition. I'm challenging you to go out and seek the wonderful work on display there for yourself! 

The winner of the painting will be the first person to pop into the gallery and take a photo of themself with one of my paintings in the background and then post it to either my Facebook page, or post and tag me ( @nicki_paints ) on Twitter. One for the social media fans! 

The first qualifying snap to be posted on either site will win the prize. Full Terms and Conditions are at the bottom of the page... 

You can pop into Inchmore Gallery any day from tomorrow between 10am and 5pm (late night opening until 8pm on Thursday, closed Sunday and Monday). Christmas Eve opening is 11am - 4pm. 

(Please note that Jane Owen Inglis and her Team at the Gallery do not have the winning painting to give away on the spot, this will be posted direct to the winner from my studio)

If you're not in reach of the gallery, don't worry, there will be another competition tomorrow, with a brand new prize, for you to try your luck with! 


 

  

Terms and Conditions - Competition One

Nicki MacRae Art (2 Springfield, Morangie Rd, Tain, Ross-shire, UK IV19 1HR, www.nickimacrae.com) is the Promotor of the competition. 

The competition is not operated by or affiliated to Inchmore Gallery, Inchmore, Inverness in any way. 

The promoters decision will be final. No alternative prize is available, and there is no cash alternative

No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost due to computer error in transit or other technical failure.

Entrant(s) must be aged 18 or over. 

You may enter as many competitions on this blog as you wish, but only one entry per competition will be valid. 

Non-winning entries will not be acknowledged. 

A winning entry must be in the form of a photograph, and must fulfil ALL of the following criteria: - 
a) taken at Inchmore Gallery
b) taken between 17/12/13 and 11/01/14, 
c) with an indefinable piece of Nicki MacRae art clearly appearing in shot,
d) includes the face of the person who is posting the competition entry.

The winner will be the first person deemed to have posted an image fitting the above criteria to EITHER 
a) to the Nicki MacRae Art Facebook page ( https://www.facebook.com/Nicki.MacRae.Art   )
or 
b) tagged with @nicki_paints on Twitter ( https://twitter.com ). 

The first photo meeting all all the above criteria posted to either platform will be judged the winner. 

Entries will be judged by The Promoter against the above criteria. The judges decision is final. 

The winner agrees to the use of their name and entry photograph in promotion, and will co-operate with any other reasonable requests by Nicki MacRae Art relating to any post-winning publicity. 

Postage of the prize to any UK address is included in the prize - postage is available to non-UK addresses at cost price, by agreement between both parties, payable by the winner. 

The Promoter cannot be responsible for damage to or loss of your prize in the postal system. 

The winner of the competition will be announced on this blog, on the Nicki MacRae Facebook page, and nicki_paints Twitter account as soon as is practicable after a winning entry has been verified. 

Reasonable efforts will be made to contact the winner(s). If the winner(s) cannot be contacted, or are unable to comply with these terms and conditions, the Promoter reserves the right to offer the prize to the next eligible entrant drawn at random.

Confirmation of the prize will be made in writing to the winner. Failure to respond and/or provide an address for delivery, or failure to meet the eligibility requirements may result in forfeiture of the prize. 

The winner agrees to the use of their name, and will co-operate with any other reasonable requests by Nicki MacRae Art relating to any post-winning publicity.